Are you signed up?

If you’re not already subscribed to these excellent updates on campaigning, I’d encourage you to do so now;

1 – NCVO Campaigning and Influence – a good monthly round-up of news, views and training opportunities.

2 – eCampaigning Forum – a busy list of over 100+ eCampaigners from around the world.

3 – Sheila McKechnie Foundation e-bulletin – a monthly newsletter promoting the work of the Foundation with useful links to the foundations blogs.

4 – MobLab Dispatches – excellent learning from the Greenpeace powered Mobilisation Lab every three weeks. A really good read.

5 – New Organizing Institute Tip of the DaySimply brilliant.

Finally, if you’ve not already subscribed to this blog, why not have new posts delivered direct to you inbox by signing up using the box on the right!

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Five for Friday…13th July

Here we go with this weeks ‘Five for Friday’. These are 5 great articles on campaigning that you should be reading this week.

1 – Not sure when to tweet? A useful visualisation of the best (and worst) times to do so.

2 – Grist asks Did 350.org’s Twitterstorm to stop fossil fuel subsidies work? 

3 – What Jamie Oliver can teach activists.

4 – Mobilisation Lab shares its top ten tips for writing emails to change the world (and if you haven’t signed up for their brilliant monthly emails I’d encourage you to do so.)

5 – Some good reflections from NCVO on the recent charity tax campaign they ran. I wish more campaigns would run this bite-sized learning with others.

What would you add to the list? 

While I’ve been away.

I’ve been in self-imposed blog exile for the last couple of months.

A combination of running a small part of an election campaign, two trips to the US for work, participation in an amazing action learning process hosted by the Common Cause team and a number of other commitments have meant that I haven’t been able to blog.

Here are a few things that caught my eye while I’ve been away;

1. Avaaz 2.0 – The global campaigning movement has launched a platform for its own members to develop and run their own actions. It’s still in beta mode at the moment but I’m sure that will change in the coming months. Also Change.org has launched its own UK platform with some great coverage. I’ve written before about how I really like the model that Change.org uses providing campaign organisers to help increase the impact of online petitions created by members. I hope that both will be successful.

2. Right Angle – The platform aims to be ‘a grassroots community. We exist to stand up for ordinary families – Britain’s silent majority’ and is supported by a number of Conservative MPs.  So far, they’ve not had the same impact that 38 Degrees had in their first few month, although they were able to generate over 100,000 people to join their Facebook campaign against cutting fuel duty, so it’ll be interesting to see how the grow over the summer.

3. Twitter – It’s been great to see organisations engage with twitter in more and more innovative ways, two particularly impressed me. The Twobby of Parliament by members of the Care and Support Alliance, and the development of this tool by ONE which allows users to send messages to David Cameron on food security.

credit - www.fairsay.com4. People’s Pledge – This sneaked under the radar , but I think the ability of an organisation to mobilise 14,000+ people in a constituency to vote for a local referendum on membership of the European Union is an impressive feat. With the introduction of the Localism bill, I wonder if we’re going to see more of this community level campaigning that leads to local ballots on issues.

5. The next Make Poverty History – It was confirmed that development organisations are coming together to launch another ‘Make Poverty History’ style campaign in 2013. I’m sure this will be huge in the next 12 months, and I’m hoping that all those involved read this about lessons learnt and ensure that the next campaign is designed to avoid them.

6. KONY 2012 – I wrote before my blogging break about why the video had such a phenomenal response when it was first released, however the campaign wasn’t able to sustain the initial interest with the ‘Cover the Night’ event in late April failing to take off in the way they’d originally hoped.

7. US Election – Lots more great articles about different techniques and tools being employed in the campaign. I’d highly recommend every campaigner keeps an eye on the articles by Sasha Issenberg over at Slate, which I’ve found to be the most insightful into the approaches the campaigns are taking.

Life is returning to normality, so I plan to write some more on these topics and others in the coming weeks, as well as share the initial results I’m getting in government departments about the number of actions they’ve received in the last 12 months.

Five for Friday….KONY 2012 Special

The Kony 2012 phenomenon is still going (and growing), it’s the officially the most viral video ever.

So this weeks ‘Five for Friday’ is dedicated to some great articles reflecting on KONY 2012 that you should be reading.

1. SocialFlow have done some brilliant work looking at how online networks helped to share the campaign and then the impact of tweeting by ‘culturemakers’, while Forbes looks at who’s watching the film. Answer – they’re 13 – 17 year old females watching it on their mobile phone.

2. Jason Mogus asks Why your non-profit won’t make a KONY 2012. It’s a very perceptive look at many of the blockages that more traditional NGOs would face if they wanted to repeat the success of KONY.

3. This is a brilliant deconstruction of why the film is so successful using lessons from persuasive techniques used by marketeers.

4. Both Weldon Kennedy and Daniel Solomon look at why the messaging and narrative of the film are so compelling. Lots of really useful lessons here for all communicators. The Mobilisation Lab also asks why the campaign hooks viewers in.

5. Ross Bailey shares his reflections and reminds us that Invisible Children didn’t get here overnight.

Five for Friday….17th February

Here we go with this weeks ‘Five for Friday’. These are 5 great articles on campaigning that you should be reading this week.

1 – Casper ter Kuile asks if the megaphone represents everything that’s wrong with campaigning.

2 – 17 pieces of good advice for anyone who writes email copy, and also a useful ‘Nonprofit Tech Checklist’.

3 – I’d really recommend Paul Mason’s new book, Why It’s Kicking Off Everywhere. If you don’t have time to read it, here is a 6 minute interview with The Guardian or the video from a longer talk at the LSE.

4 – It might sound dull, but the European Citizens Initiative will mean if you can get 1 million fellow European citizens to sign your petition then the European Commission will bring forward a proposal for a legal act. More on how it can work for your organisation here but the risks here.

5 – I think that this Amnesty campaign which uses the music identification app Shazam is brilliant.

And if you didn’t see it earlier in the week, have a look at my post on the importance of trust in campaigning.

What would you add to the list? 

Five for Friday…..20th Jan

Here we go with the first ‘Five for Friday’ post of 2012. These are 5 great articles on campaigning that you should be reading this week.

1 – How disabled activists took to social media to disseminate their research ahead of this weeks vote on reforming the DLA.

2 – The Engaging Volunteers blog asks if we should reconsider the role that clicktivism in engaging supporters.

3 – Three top tips for good political communication from Regan’s former speech writer.

4 – These tips about how to get your views into a newspaper as an academic are also useful for campaigners.

5 – Leadership lessons from Martin Luther King.

And if you didn’t see it earlier in the week, have a look at my post on getting your email updates read.

What would you add to the list?

Five for Friday….28th October

Sorry for a quiet week on the blog, but work has been rather busy! Anyhow, here are five things that every campaigner should read this Friday.

1. Can’t decide which e-campaigning tool to choose. Hugh Mouser has done the hard work of comparing them for you.
2. The Guardian Voluntary Sector Network has insight from National Deaf Children’s Society about how they built and launched an effective media campaign against government cuts.
3. POLIS has a write up of seminar about how investigative journalism can help campaigns. (h/t @framingthedot).
4. I wrote earlier in the month about how 38 Degrees was encouraging supporters to lobby a Lord. Lib Dem Lord, Paul Tyler has some feedback for them. (h/t @nicseton)
5. The Huffington Post has a video interview on the role of civil disobedience in making change happen with Kumi Naidoo from Greenpeace.